ProgramsMTSRF

Project 4.8.6 JCU Coghlan, A. and Prideaux, B. (2012) Reef Tourism Third Yearly Report. Patterns of reef tourism on the GBR, Tropical North Queensland and the Whitsundays. Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility, Cairns
Visitor surveys provide valuable marketing and management information on trends in tourism to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). This third annual report highlights the results of this year’s surveys collected by partner tour operators at the GBR. A total of 2942 surveys were collected in 2009, bringing the total number of completed surveys to 7569 over the last three years.

Project 4.8.6 JCU Coghlan, A. and Prideaux, B. (2012). Reef Tourism Drivers and Trends: Synthesis report. Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility, Cairns
This report presents a synthesis of research undertaken at James Cook University on aspects of reef tourism on the Great Barrier Reef. The report examines trends and drivers of tourism on the reef and compares results obtained from three related visitor monitoring studies. The discussion begins with an analysis of events that may have affected tourism to the Great Barrier Reef followed by a discussion of data collected from visitors. The report then compares data collected during the three surveys. Finally, the report highlights information gaps in reef tourism research and provides suggestions for future research.

T20 AIMS Cappo, M. et al. (2011) The influence of zoning (closure to fishing) on fish communities of the shoals and reef bases of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Complementary analysis of observations from divers and baited video surveys to quantify the influence of region, habitat and zoning, and extension of results to regional groups
This report comprises a new synthesis of pair-wise comparisons of deep shoals open and closed to fishing, by incorporating new data on seafloor habitats, complementary data from shallow water fish surveys, and public outreach using novel, video-based extension tools.

T23 JCU Sibtain, J. and Prideaux, B. (2010) Tourist Exit Survey: 2009 and Final Report: January 2007 – December 2009. 2007 – 2009 Patterns of Reef and Rainforest Tourism in North Queensland from Exit Surveys Conducted at Cairns Domestic Airport
The specific aim of this research was to develop a comprehensive data set, on a quarterly basis, that facilitates investigation of a range of issues, including demographic profiles, motivations, activities, segmentation and seasonality of visitors in the Tropical North Queenlsand Region (TNQ). In this final annual report for the MTSRF program, data is provided on an annual, as well as a whole of project, time scale. Comparisons of annual data are provided for 2007, 2008, 2009 and for the overall 2007-2009 survey results.

T23 JCU Sibtain, J. and Prideaux, B. (2012) Rainforest Tourism 2009 and Final Report: January 2007 – December 2009. Patterns of Rainforest Tourism in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, North Queensland. Report to the Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility. Reef and Rainforest Research Centre Limited, Cairns.

T23 JCU Sibtain, J. and Prideaux, B. (2012) Rainforest Tourism Drivers Trends and Management Tools: Synthesis Report. Reef and Rainforest Research Centre Limited, Cairns
The aim of this report is to present a synthesis of research undertaken by James Cook University tourism researchers into aspects of tourism in the Wet Tropics rainforests of Tropical North Queensland. It also discusses two models that may be used as management tools for rainforest tourism. The report examines trends and drivers of tourism in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (WTWHA). The discussion commences with an analysis of events that may have affected tourism in Tropical North Queensland followed by a discussion of data collected from visitors to the WTWHA. The report then synthesises data collected during the life of the project and outlines rainforest management tools developed during the project. Finally, the report highlights information gaps in rainforest tourism research and provides suggestions for future research.

T23 JCU Thompson, M. and Prideaux, B. (2010) Interdependency of reef and rainforest tourism – a segmentation analysis of visitors to Tropical North Queensland. Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility, Cairns
Segmentation is an important tool for marketers and the results of this research indicate that Tropical North Queensland has a number of well defined segments. The report identifies these segments and changes in them during the period 2007–2010. Segmenting visitors at the destination level enables tourism firms and marketers to identify the drivers of demand (push factors) as well as the destination’s pull factors and how successful these have been in attracting the desired target markets. The report confirms the importance of the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics Rainforests as the region’s major tourist attractions. The data also indicate that there are significant differences in tourism experiences between first-time visitors and repeat visitors, e.g. repeat visitors are much less likely to revisit the GBR than the WTR but more likely to visit regional areas including the Atherton Tablelands. Visitors were segmented by travel motivations and socio-demographic characteristics. The clusters and segments identified in this report provide destination marketers, management authorities and tourism operators with valuable market intelligence. The data can be used to inform decisions regarding the development of infrastructure, destination marketing and the introduction of new tourism products that match visitors’ changing motivations.

T28 UTAS Bowman, D. et al. (2010) Rainforest Expansion in Far North Queensland: A preliminary analysis of the Windsor and Carbine Tablelands
In the Wet Tropics of Queensland, tropical rainforest covered an estimated 965,000 ha prior to European settlement of the area during the 19th and 20th centuries. Subsequent human impacts resulted in a reduction in the area of rainforest to approximately 750,000 ha. A distinctive feature of rainforest in the wetter parts of northeastern Queensland is the often abrupt boundary between the rainforest and adjacent eucalypt dominated vegetation or grassland. The vegetation dynamics of the rainforest boundary has been the subject of immense scientific interest. While rainforest boundaries may appear abrupt and stable, pollen records suggest that these boundaries have been expanding and contracting throughout geological history. Possible reasons for rainforest expansion include climatic amelioration and/or release from fire suppression. Here, we explore the rates of landscape change and landscape conditions associated with rainforst expansion in the Wet Tropics World Heritage region of northeastern Queensland. We assess change in rainforest in a 270 square kilometre study area within the Wet Tropics Bioregion, and ask to what extent rates of rainforest change were similar for particular time periods and mediated by climatic and landscape conditions.

T38 CSIRO Coggan, A. et al. (2010) Landscape scale outcomes from market based instruments: Design principles for biodiversity offsets
Offsetting damage to environmental assets is becoming accepted practice internationally and within Australia. The increased use of offsets has not coincided with consensus on offset scope or design. Instead, experience across locations including the United States, Latin America, Canada, New Zealand and Australia reveals a suite of different offset design approaches. These offset markets range from formalised and centralised exchanges with established metrics and systems to support anonymous and price based trading, through to offset requirements based on expert opinion with transactions dependent on individual relationships and negotiation. Offset evaluation and commentary to date has tended to focus on whether offsets are able to deliver the desired biophysical effect rather than on design effectiveness. The purpose of this project was to begin to address the deficiency of design evaluation and to deliver a set of best practice principles for offset design and implementation. A further ‘key aim’ of this project was to expand our understanding of patch for patch (non strategic focussed on impact) offset design best practice principles to those that can apply to a sustainable landscape framework. Future research opportunities with a focus on offsets and landscape outcomes are provided later in this report.

T40 JCU McNamara, K. (2011) Assessing environmental research needs across three communities in the Torres Strait (fact sheet)
Having locals identify environmental research needs for their own community is a key step to ensuring that research is relevant, appropriate and desirable for communities. Communities in the torres Strait are no exception to this and three island communities in particular are the focus of this research project funded by the Australian Government’s MTSRF Transition Program.

T40 JCU McNamara, K. et al. (2010) Assessing environmental research needs across three communities in the Torres Strait
This report presents the environmental research needs of locals living in three island communities in the Torres Strait region. The project sought to conduct an assessment of environmental research needs in a number of Torres Strait communities, and also involve some TSRA Land and Sea Management Unit (LSMU) staff. The core aim of this project was to attempt to ensure that knowledge generated from future applied research arrangements is appropriate and useful for end-users throughout the Torres Strait. These end-users for future research include government agencies such as the TSRA, leaders and representatives (such as Island Councilors, Island Managers and PBC members), elders, and locals living in the communities where research is being conducted. This document provides a synthesis of the outputs of the project and forms a basis for future environmental research carried out in Torres Strait.


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